12 Days of Confidence

Day 7

We’ve all heard the voice inside that says “You’re such a rookie, how are you even employed? Don’t they know you haven’t got a clue?”

 

 Well, thanks, Imposter Syndrome, for your comments, but you’re not welcome here.

If you find yourself struggling with those thoughts, tell yourself this:

I love these categories identified by imposter syndrome expert, Valerie Young. Maybe you recognise yourself or someone you know in these descriptions….

  • Perfectionists” set extremely high expectations for themselves, and even if they meet 99% of their goals, they’re going to feel like failures. Any small mistake will make them question their own competence.

  • Experts” feel the need to know every piece of information before they start a project and constantly look for new certifications or trainings to improve their skills. They won’t apply for a job if they don’t meet all the criteria in the posting, and they might be hesitant to ask a question in class or speak up in a meeting at work because they’re afraid of looking stupid if they don’t already know the answer.

  • When the “natural genius” has to struggle or work hard to accomplish something, he or she thinks this means they aren’t good enough. They are used to skills coming easily, and when they have to put in effort, their brain tells them that’s proof they’re an impostor.

  • Soloists” feel they have to accomplish tasks on their own, and if they need to ask for help, they think that means they are a failure or a fraud.

  • “Supermen” or “superwomen” push themselves to work harder than those around them to prove that they’re not impostors. They feel the need to succeed in all aspects of life—at work, as parents, as partners—and may feel stressed when they are not accomplishing something.

Me? Ok since we are friends I’ll confess…. I’m a combination of a Soloist and a Natural Genius. And the critical voices in my head got distinctly louder when I became a parent too. So what would I say to a friend having the same limiting beliefs?

 

"You are doing your best. You’re not perfect, but that’s okay. Nobody is. You’re doing your best, that’s the most you can ever do, and it’s more than enough. And yes, mistakes will happen but that’s okay too."

As always, remember to say this out loud – and multiple times if you need. Saying it out loud gives it more power.

Now it is your turn, which type are you? Hit reply, join a squad of Experts or SuperPeople who feel just like you and let me know how

you’re going to face up to that pesky imposter voice.

For more on Imposter Syndrome take a look at this article.